Category Archives: Uncategorized

What still works in Qualtrics free accounts (3/20/2016)

In the last few months Qualtrics has begun handicapping its free accounts. For a couple of years they were the best deal in online research: the Qualtrics system, very few restrictions, and a price tag of $0.  Of course I should have known that the days of wine and data wouldn’t last forever. They appear to be over.

So, to save other researchers a little time (assuming this post shows up in Google), here is what my students and I have currently experienced. Of course, our experiences might not be representative, and things might change overnight (as they seem to have done recently).

Restrictions on Qualtrics “free accounts” (or “trial accounts”) AFAIK as of March 20, 2016:

  • No Downloading Data. This is the absolutely most important thing: newly-created accounts, starting a relatively short time ago (a couple of months?) are do  not allow download. You can look at your data only through Qualtrics’ “reports” or summary stats on a per-variable basis. Or that’s what I think the situation is. But no downloading means no correlations, no t-tests, no regression analysis, no ANOVA, no trend analysis, etc.
  • No Importing Survey Files. So if you have a survey file from a colleague, or a previous account, you can’t import it into Qualtrics, unless you have a paid account. That kinda bites.
  • No Viewing, Creating, or Managing Panels Linked to Collaborated Surveys. I am a “collaborator” (with my free account) on a multi-survey project housed in a colleague’s full account. The survey uses panels and validation. I apparently have no access to that.
  • Only one survey can be active at a time. But that was always a free account limitation; no change.
  • No Panel Data. Again, this was always a free account limitation, AFAICR.

As of now, I don’t know of any limitations on number of responses, number of surveys you can create in your account (as long as only one is active), etc.

It’s a little painful to me to see Qualtrics going in this direction, though it’s predictable and probably very good for their bottom line. Nearly a decade ago I was evangelizing for Qualtrics at my former university, singing the company’s praises, including the reasonable pricing for academics. Now, the “special plan for academics” is 1000 responses for $500. That probably doesn’t even register on some people’s radar. For me, however, doing research at a university with fairly little research support, it’s painful. We usually get about $600 per year for professional conferences–which, of course, covers about 1/3 of the costs of a national conference. Universities all over the US are in varying stages of budget crisis, so this situation is pretty common.

I think Qualtrics has realized it’s the dominant product right now, and has decided to charge what it can, because it can. Sadly, this leaves some academics out in the cold.

Migrated blog to webfaction centos 7 and php 5.6, fixed wordpress problem.

In case it’s of any use to anyone, here are the results of a couple hours of googling and reading Webfaction’s support (as well as php and wordpress help files).

After having my site migrated from a centos (5?) server to a centos 7 server with the excellent webhost webfaction, I discovered yet again that I am not a sysadmin or programmer or whatever. This blog would not load. Mostly navigating to this URL just caused the browser to try to download the index.php file instead of displaying its results. For the fix, click “more” (or whatever the link says). Most people do not want to know this; those who do will click 🙂 Continue reading

Indigo Girls: November 14, 2015 – Babeville, Buffalo, NY

I’ve been an Indigo Girls fan since 1990, when a girlfriend gave me Closer to Fine on a mix tape. I followed their music–in recordings only–through their next two or three albums, and then on and off over the ones after that, but I’ve kept listening to those 1990s songs. I can sing along with most of their first record and Nomads, Indians, Saints. I love many of those songs, and think the rest are OK. So they were just a band to me, until last night. I had the sense that they were good in live shows, but that vague understanding didn’t approximate the reality: in recordings the Indigo Girls are really good–deeper, more meaningful music than most of what’s been out there for three decades–but in person they make sense. All sorts of things come together with a satisfying clicking sensation. Before last night I did not even quite know the difference between Amy Ray and Emily Saliers, but now it’s impossible not to know, and understand, that difference. Continue reading

Trigger warnings fail to divide along classic lines

I’m really fascinated lately by how the concept of “trigger warnings” has divided various North American communities–academics, political pundits, students, abuse victims, civil rights advocates, etc. Mostly I’m fascinated because the issue doesn’t divide cleanly along traditional battle lines like “left/right,” “progressive/conservative,” “male/female,” “individualist/collectivist,” etc.

There is now (2015, Fall) a compelling description of how this issue, arguably run amok, basically shut down one professor’s course. This piece is notable because it’s not the standard rant about hypersensitive students, written by people who have very little sociocultural vulnerability–it’s a narrative from a professor attempting to expose and celebrate minority sexuality in film, a prof who doubles as a rape crisis counselor, a professor (sadly, this seems relevant) who is female and an ethnic minority. Demands from a few (apparently highly fragile) students derailed what appears to have been a relevant, informative, iconoclastic, and edgy class. In other words, the things college should be about, in any “good liberal’s” fondest daydreams, were shut down by other liberals.

So it’s getting pretty interesting. It’s liberals against liberals up in here. Educators against educators. Students against students. I’ve got more pat phrases like that, but I’ll stop now.

Notably, not everyone is convinced that trigger warnings are destroying America. And my own experience, at a “public liberal arts” university in the Northeast/Midwest, has not included any “PC tyranny;” but, then again, I’m a middle-aged white male, so perhaps I’m not going to bear the brunt of this kind of thing even if it is happening around me. Some of my colleagues report increasing emotional fragility of students in regards to classroom content, but I have mainly noticed increased fragility in regards to reading between class periods and finding test questions based on lecture content that was not in the PowerPoint slides.

I was slightly surprised to find that AAUP has published an official statement about trigger warnings, calling them “infantilizing and anti-intellectual.” I don’t know that I’m comfortable going quite so far down that road, but I do recognize that the desire to protect the psychologically vulnerable can rub uncomfortably against other core values, particularly free speech.  Continue reading

Excellent piece about the “commodification” of higher education

In “How college sold its soul to the market”, the estimable eloquently describes my own thoughts about the spiral of higher education toward becoming a servant of financial economies instead of a place where we learn to be thoughtful, analytical, useful citizens in our societies.

This is one of the many  key points for me: “This is not inevitable. It is the result of choices we have made, driven by an ideology that we have allowed to impose itself upon us.”

Because this essay is so awesome, I’m going to post a bunch more quotes I thought were particularly great after the break. Continue reading

Online tools a-go-go: Dokuwiki, Moodle, Limesurvey, and OwnCloud

Lately, I’m all about leveraging the mostly-unused bandwidth, memory, and disk space I pay for from my webhost every month. So I’ve got ownCloud up and running with few problems,  my moodle installation is working nicely, I’ve revived my LimeSurvey installation so I can do class surveys, polls, etc., and–brand new–I’ve got DokuWiki installed and running.

The last one is something I’ve been meaning to do for quite some time. My undergrad stats content has morphed and grown and (I hope) become somewhat refined over a decade or two and half a dozen textbooks. I have thought of typing up some “professor’s notes” for the students, but then a couple of years ago it occurred to me that a wiki would be a great way to maintain that. So that’s what I did. It has very little content right now, that I’m slowly changing that. It might or might not be something like a full set of course notes during this Fall semester. If not, I hope Spring will see a full, robust wiki for the students.

Oh, and speaking of that, OpenIntro has released version 3.0 of their nice, industry-disrupting (OK, not much, but they try) undergraduate statistics textbook. It’s not the most student-friendly text out there (especially for psychology students), but it’s free and it’s accurate.

But I really need to get the wiki content filled out so the students have a second source for the information.

The Mars and Venus thing is stupid, but it’s not sexism

Last fall, my university had a tiny kerfuffle: a student working for the university’s social media team retweeted another student’s tweet. It’s been deleted, but it said,[university], where the weather is more confusing than the women.” Somebody cried foul, one thing led to another, and the President of the university issued a mea culpa about this event that “…quite simply shouldn’t have happened,” agreeing that the message was “sexist,” with “offensive implications,” and “hurtful.” As a result of this incident, the President has asked for “new policies on oversight of messages on the website and social media.”

I currently study men’s beliefs about women–particularly men’s beliefs that women are “fundamentally unknowable” (i.e., approximately as confusing as the weather), so this caught my eye when I (belatedly) found out about it.

TL;DR: I don’t think it was “sexist” in the way we usually use that term, and I think, from a logical point of view, the university administration overreacted. However, from a realpolitik perspective any university President in her right mind would have reacted the same way.

Continue reading

admin

2015-05-23

Amazing session with statisticians (and Gelman) pointing out big current problems. Suggestions for teaching stats? *crickets* #aps15nyc

admin

2015-05-23

Damn an entire field for ignoring science, then defend sweeping assertions with bad anecdotes? Live by the data, die by the data #aps15nyc

admin

2015-05-23

#aps15nyc If you’re not listening to the “philosophy of statistics” presentations, you’re missing the very polite fight of the year.